Julia Donaldson’s Staedtler Tradition

Julia Donaldson (Image © The Documentary Unit Scotland / BBC Studios)

This is a quick follow up linked to the previous blog post about Sara Ogilvie’s Staedtler Tradition.

Julia Donaldson wrote the text for the previously mentioned book ‘The Detective Dog’ and is world-famous for her Gruffalo book(s). It’s great to know that she is also partial to good pencils …and like Sara Ogilvie she is also using Staedtler’s Tradition.

Julia Donaldson writing with a Staedtler Tradition (Image © The Documentary Unit Scotland / BBC Studios)

The screenshots of Julia Donaldson using a Staedtler Tradition have been taken from the documentary ‘The Magical World of Julia Donaldson’. I believe that the use of these images falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.


Sara Ogilvie’s Staedtler Tradition

My son has accumulated quite a few picture books over the years. They are mainly used as good night stories. When it comes to the beauty of the drawings there is one firm favourite for me: The Detective Dog.

(Image © Macmillan Children’s Books)

In the past I tried to find out more about the artist behind this book’s drawings, but wasn’t very successful – so you can imagine my surprise when not only was she being mentioned on TV, you could even see her using a Staedtler Tradition for her drawings.

Sara Ogilvie drawing with a Staedtler Tradition (Image © The Documentary Unit Scotland / BBC Studios)

She’s certainly not the first British artist using the Staedtler Tradition that is being mentioned in this blog and I am quite sure she won’t be the last.

Sara Ogilvie sharpening her Staedtler Tradition (Image © The Documentary Unit Scotland / BBC Studios)

Some of the drawings characteristics made me think the book’s drawings were produced on a computer, so seeing they were made with pencil and paper ..and a with Staedtler made this Staedtler fanboy very happy.


The screenshots of Sara Ogilvie using a Staedtler Tradition have been taken from the documentary ‘The Magical World of Julia Donaldson’. I believe that the use of these images falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.


Eberhard Faber 2

It was great to see that Lexikaliker and Orange Crate Art mentioning Sean in a recent post.

Sean wrote several books about music, but his Eberhard Faber book will now never be finished.

In his memory I would like to share one of the 264 pages that I have seen with you.

Page 2 of Sean’s book about Eberhard Faber

Click on the image for a higher resolution.


Sean Malone 1

Pencil Talk already mentioned this yesterday: Sean Malone has passed away. Like Stephen, the Pencil Talk editor, I was very sad to hear the news. Sean was the brilliant mind behind Pencils and Music, a now offline blog he started around 2010, as well as the amazing  Blackwing Pages and Contrapuntalism blogs.

He was an accomplished musician, as you will see if you search for him on the Internet. He was not only a real life rock star, he was also a rock star in our stationery fandom niche. He even met Count Anton-Wolfgang von Faber-Castell and Eberhard Faber IV.

Sean, we miss you!

Sean Malone


In praise of the pencil 1

Yesterday’s edition of the Financial Times featured an article by Tim Harford about our beloved pencil.

Tim Harford is a journalist (‘the Financial Times’ undercover economist’) and is also the man behind my favourite radio show: More or Less.

He is certainly non stranger to pencils as they feature in his work every now and then. In his radio show he even managed to sneak in a definition of ‘ferrule’.

His pencil work got him several mentions here at Bleistift.blog so far. Last year, this blog mentioned his pencil article for the BBC and a few years earlier Bleistift.blog ‘campaigned’ to get the pencil added as the 51st thing to his series ’50 Things That Made the Modern Economy’.

His latest book, How To Make The World Add Up, is currently Radio 4’s book of the week. If you not only like stationery, but also statistics or numbers, then please have a listen.

You won’t be surprised to read that a signed copy of his book is on top of my Christmas wish list. A signed copy must be expensive, I hear you say. Well, you’d think, but actually it’s much cheaper than what a pack of copies of Eberhard Faber’s Blackwing sells for in the UK.