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A dangerous pencil hack 2

Youtube suggested I should watch this video – I couldn’t resist.

Having touched a live 240V wire by mistake was a memorable experience (I still remember it even though it was twenty years ago), so I am not too keen on trying this pencil hack out and I suggest you don’t either.

The idea is interesting, though. An explanation how this works would be nice.

Again, I don’t suggest that you try this at home (or at work, or while out and about).


Farewell Joe Dever / Medieval Manuscript Marginalia 5

Farewell Joe Dever

I just found out that Joe Dever, the author behind the Lone Wolf books and other books and games, has died.

His Choose Your Own Adventure books are great. I didn’t own any as a kid, but lent a few from friends who had them. Twenty years later I bought some and again rediscovered them another ten years later.

As his millennium gift Joe Dever made his books available free of charge online.

joedevergoodbye

Well, here’s my Choose your own Goodbye:

1 If you wish to bid him farewell turn to 2

2 You say “I bid you farewell, my brother. May the luck of the gods go with you.”1

 

 

Medieval Manuscript Marginalia

This morning Radio 4’s Today programme talked about marginalia in medieval manuscripts2.

You can listen to it online, the segment about the marginalia starts at 1:43:40

marginalia

In this segment Dr. Johanna Green from the University of Glasgow looks at the doodles and ink flow tests in the margins of a 15th century manuscript.

Fascinating!


I believe that the use of the twitter screenshot in this blog post falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.

  1. Joe Dever. “Flight from the Dark.”, Section 349 []
  2. I was quite tempted to spell it mediæval []

Nail-gun-sharpening discontinued glow-in-the-dark pencils 1

What an odd blog post title, but it’s just about a few things worth mentioning that didn’t make it into their own blog posts. You might have already seen some on Bleistift’s Facebook page.

 

Pilot 78G

It’s quite sad to read that the Pilot 78G has been discontinued. I have been using one for a while and really like it. There were rumours about it being discontinued for a while, but it now seems to have come true. You can still get them cheap on eBay, especially the ones with M or B nibs.

Image from ebay seller currycurrysing

Image from ebay seller currycurrysing

I just bought a blue one with a fine nib. More expensive than many other 78Gs, but still not more expensive than a Lamy Safari.

 

Roald Dahl

Bruce send me this link to a video where Roald Dahl, probably most famous for his books for children, talks about sharpening pencils.

Nail Gun

A very different way of sharpening pencils: a nail gun with a built-in pencil sharpener on Reddit.

 

Glow-in-the-dark pencil

I wish our city had a store like that (Image © Karrot Entertainment)

I wish our city had a store like that (Image © Karrot Entertainment)

When our little one was watching CeeBeebies I noticed that the episode of Sarah & Duck he was watching also had some content for stationery fans. It was about a glow-in-the-dark pencil.

Glow-in-the-dark pencils (Image © Karrot Entertainment)

Glow-in-the-dark pencils (Image © Karrot Entertainment)


I believe that the use of the eBay image and the images shown in this blog post, taken from the third episode pf the third season of Sarah & Duck, falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.


Blades, pencils and Christmas tree ornaments

Just a few things I want to mention. I think there was something else I wanted to add, but I forgot…

Pollux spare blades

Thanks to Gunther from the Lexikaliker blog I got a set of spare blades for my Pollux when I met him last month at Insights X.  Thank you!

Pollux spare blades

Pollux spare blades

Royal Mail’s 17th century pencil

Royal Mail’s Great Fire of London Special Stamps feature a 17th century pencil. I don’t have the stamp, but I have the postcard with the same picture, so I thought I show you this pencil (the red one on the left), together with a similar pencil – the one from Staedtler’s historic pencil kit. Petroski (1989, p. 47)1 writes that by 1610 black lead was used by artists and others to fit into their wooden pencil cases ..so a pencil being used in the planning of the reconstruction of London in 1666 seems realistic.

Royal Mail's pencil from 1666

Royal Mail’s pencil from 1666

Kaweco Christmas Tree Ornament

You might have already seen this on Bleistift’s Facebook page: There’s a Kaweco Christmas Tree Ornament.

Kaweco Tree Ornament (Image © Kaweco or Massdrop)

Kaweco Tree Ornament (Image © Kaweco or Massdrop)

 

 


The photo of the Kaweco  Tree Ornament has been taken from the Massdrop offer of this product. I believe that showing the photo in this blog post falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.

  1. Petroski, H. (1989) The Pencil []

Pencil production on TV

This wood will become Wopex material

This wood will become Wopex material (Image © Pro7)

Earlier this month I was in Germany and was lucky enough to have been part of a Staedtler factory tour in Nuremberg.

Sharpening the pencils

Sharpening the pencils (Image © Pro7)

Staedtler’s pencils are actually made or assembled in Neumarkt, but the leads are from Nuremberg, so even though I wasn’t able to see the pencils being made I was able to see how the leads are being made there …but more about this another time.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 16.20.24

(Image © Pro7)

I am mentioning this because Mr Rüdel, who showed us around, told me about a clip from a TV programme that has recently been filmed in the factory. You can watch it here. It’s about Staedtler’s pencil production. Unfortunately the clip is in German only and if you live outside Germany it might not play form that web site and you might need to use some tricks to get it to play, but I’ve added some screenshots to give you a rough idea what the video is about.

Mr Rüdel making pencils as a medieval craftsman

Mr Rüdel making pencils as a medieval craftsman (Image © Pro7)


I believe that the use of the image shown in this blog post, taken from episode 191 from the 2016 season of Galileo, falls under “fair dealing” as described by the UK Copyright service.